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    Over the summer, select and read one or more of the books listed below. For each book you read, complete a double entry journal; it could be typed or written, but if you choose to write it, completing it in a notebook, either spiral or composition is preferable. Make sure to follow the directions closely as it is written below in order to receive credit.

    A double entry journal divides the page into two columns. Every time you make an entry into this journal, you will have to complete both columns. You should make an entry every time you come across a section in the book that does one of the following:

    1. evokes some kind of strong emotion,
    2. when you have a question about something that happened,
    3. when the writing reminds you of something you know about from your own experiences,
    4. when the author is using some kind of technique you wish to comment on, like foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, imagery, or allusion,
    5. or when a reference to something historical of cultural is made and you wish to comment on whether you know or believe that what has been said is indeed historically factual.

    When any of these things occur, I want you in the left column to write the page number and incomplete sentences explain/ give a summary of what exactly happened in the section you were reading. Then on the right hand side, I want you in complete sentences to write your response to what happened. Use the outline and example below as a guide:

    Quid accidit?

    Tuum reponsum!

     

    Write the page number and write one or more complete sentences explaining what just happened in the section you were reading. Give a summary of that section in one or more complete sentences.

     

    In complete sentences, explain your reaction to the reading. Answer one of the following questions:

    a) How do you feel about what just happened and why?

    b) What question might you have about something that just happened?

    c) Is there something in your past or in your life now that is similar to what you just read? What is it and how is it similar?

    di) Do you think the author is trying to foreshadow/ give hints about a future event? What do you think is going to happen and how do you know?

    dii) Does the author use some kind of comparison to make something more understandable? How has the comparison helped you better picture what is happening?

    diii) Does the author use certain words that help create a picture in your mind? What does this picture look like?

    div) Does the author make some kind of reference to another book, myth, or story, and if so, what do you know about that book, myth, or story?

    e) What historical event or cultural occurrence is the author referencing? What do you know about this historical event or cultural reference? Do you find what the author says believable and why?

     

    Made Up Examples

    Quid accidit?

    Tuum responsum!

     

    pg. 32 – Flavia finds out that her father is upset because he lost the family signet ring. He runs frantically around the house looking for the ring.

     

     

     

     

     

    pg. 43 – Flavia notices that the ground has been shaking very frequently. She sees animals running away from the nearby mountain.

     

    This part refers to an item that really did exist in Rome – the signet ring. The signet ring allowed a Roman to sign contracts and do business. Therefore it is believable that Flavia’s father is so angry about losing the ring, because it is such an important item.

     

     

    These are all signs that the nearby mountain is more than just a mountain; it is a volcano. But the people in the city do not realize it is a volcano. This is a good example of dramatic irony – when the reader knows something that the characters in the book do not. And it is an example of foreshadowing, as the volcano will likely erupt soon. This scene also reminds me of the time when there was a small earthquake in East Aurora. Not many people felt it, but I did. I wasn’t scared though because it was so small. I think I would be scared if I was in Pompeii and the earth was trembling.

     

    Nota Bene – You must have a minimum of one journal entry per every 25 pages, always rounded down. So, if you read a book that is 150 pages long, you need at least 6 journal entries. If you read a book that is 303 pages long, you need at least 12 journal entries. If you read a book that is 345 pages long, you need at least 13 journal entries.

     

    You may choose from one of the following books:

    Roman Mysteries: The Thieves of Ostia, by Caroline Lawrence, 2001

    Roman Mysteries: The Secrets of Vesuvius, by Caroline Lawrence, 2001

    Roman Mysteries: The Pirates of Pompeii, by Caroline Lawrence, 2002

    Roman Mysteries: The Assasins of Rome, by Caroline Lawrence, 2002

    Roman Mysteries: The Dolphins of Laurentum, by Caroline Lawrence, 2003

    Roman Mysteries: The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina, by Caroline Lawrence, 2003

    Roman Mysteries: The Enemies of Jupiter, by Caroline Lawrence, 2003

    Roman Mysteries: The Gladiators from Capua, by Caroline Lawrence, 2004

    Roman Mysteries: The Colossus of Rhodes, by Caroline Lawrence, 2005

    Roman Mysteries: The Fugitive from Corinth, by Caroline Lawrence, 2005

    Roman Mysteries: The Sirens from Surrentum, by Caroline Lawrence, 2006

    Roman Mysteries: The Charioteer of Delphi, by Caroline Lawrence, 2006

    Roman Mysteries: The Slave-Girl from Jerusalem, by Caroline Lawrence, 2007

    Roman Mysteries: The Beggar of Volubilis, by Caroline Lawrence, 2008

    Roman Mysteries: The Scribes from Alexandria, by Caroline Lawrence, 2008

    Roman Mysteries: The Prophet from Ephesus, by Caroline Lawrence, 2008

    Roman Mysteries: The Man from Pomegranate Street, by Caroline Lawrence, 2009

    The Code of Romulus, by Caroline Lawrence, 2007

    Trimalchio’s Feast and Other Mini-Mysteries, by Caroline Lawrence, 2007

    The Legionary from Londinium and Other Mini-Mysteries, by Caroline Lawrence, 2010

    The Titan’s Curse, by Rick Riordan, 2007

    The Battle of the Labyrinth, by Rick Riordan, 2008

    The Last Olympian, by Rick Riordan, 2009

    The Storm Before the Storm, by Mike Duncan, 2018

    Tres Fabulae Horrificae, by Jocelyn Demuth, 2017